DAILY SELECTIONS FROM LAO-TZU’S TAO TE CHING — AUGUST 31, 2019

True words aren’t eloquent;
eloquent words aren’t true.
Wise men don’t need to prove their point;
men who need to prove their point aren’t wise.

The Master has no possessions.
The more he does for others,
the happier he is.
The more he gives to others,
the wealthier he is.

The Tao nourishes by not forcing.
By not dominating, the Master leads.

-Lao-tzu- (Tao Te Ching, verse 81, interpretation by Stephen Mitchell)

DAILY SELECTIONS FROM LAO-TZU’S TAO TE CHING — AUGUST 30, 2019

If a country is governed wisely,
its inhabitants will be content.
They enjoy the labor of their hands
and don’t waste time inventing
labor-saving machines.
Since they dearly love their homes,
they aren’t interested in travel.
There may be a few wagons and boats,
but these don’t go anywhere.
There may be an arsenal of weapons,
but nobody ever uses them.
People enjoy their food,
take pleasure in being with their families,
spend weekends working in their gardens,
delight in the doings of the neighborhood.
And even though the next country is so close
that people can hear its roosters crowing
and its dogs barking,
they are content to die of old age
without ever having gone to see it.

-Lao-tzu- (Tao Te Ching, verse 80, interpretation by Stephen Mitchell)

DAILY SELECTIONS FROM LAO-TZU’S TAO TE CHING — AUGUST 28, 2019

Nothing in the world
is as soft and yielding as water.
Yet for dissolving the hard and inflexible,
nothing can surpass it.

The soft overcomes the hard;
the gentle overcomes the rigid.
Everyone knows this is true,
but few can put it into practice.

Therefore the Master remains
serene in the midst of sorrow.
Evil cannot enter his heart.
Because he has given up helping,
he is people’s greatest help.

True words seem paradoxical.

-Lao-tzu- (Tao Te Ching, verse 78, interpretation by Stephen Mitchell)

DAILY SELECTIONS FROM LAO-TZU’S TAO TE CHING — AUGUST 27, 2019

As it acts in the world, the Tao
is like the bending of a bow.
The top is bent downward;
the bottom is bent up.
It adjusts excess and deficiency
so that there is perfect balance.
It takes from what is too much
and gives to what isn’t enough.

Those who try to control,
who use force to protect their power,
go against the direction of the Tao.
They take from those who don’t have enough
and give to those who have far too much.

The Master can keep giving
because there is no end to her wealth.
She acts without expectation,
succeeds without taking credit,
and doesn’t think that she is better
than anyone else.

-Lao-tzu- (Tao Te Ching, verse 77, interpretation by Stephen Mitchell)

DAILY SELECTIONS FROM LAO-TZU’S TAO TE CHING — AUGUST 26, 2019

Men are born soft and supple;
dead, they are stiff and hard.
Plants are born tender and pliant;
dead, they are brittle and dry.

Thus whoever is stiff and inflexible
is a disciple of death.
Whoever is soft and yielding
is a disciple of life.

The hard and stiff will be broken.
The soft and supple will prevail.

-Lao-tzu- (Tao Te Ching, verse 76, interpretation by Stephen Mitchell)

DAILY SELECTIONS FROM LAO-TZU’S TAO TE CHING — AUGUST 24, 2019

If you realize that all things change,
there is nothing you will try to hold on to.
If you aren’t afraid of dying,
there is nothing you can’t achieve.

Trying to control the future
is like trying to take the master carpenter’s place.
When you handle the master carpenter’s tools,
chances are that you’ll cut your hand.

-Lao-tzu- (Tao Te Ching, verse 74, interpretation by Stephen Mitchell)